When creating an offer, a landing page, subscription/sign up form, ask only for necessary information. People really don’t want to be bothered to fill in infinite spaces; in most cases, an email address and a name are more than enough. Ask for more info, and people won’t take time to fill it out, let alone leave their email. To successfully collect email addresses,  keep it short and straightforward.

When I'm not designing websites, doing this online marketing stuff or writing. I love nothing more than getting out on a weekend and scuba diving. I'm a qualified rescue diver and love getting wet in the waters around Perth and Rottenest Island. I also cycle, which must be a sight as I'm not the thinnest of people (lol)... and a paddle on a kayak or a swim helps makes most weeks, perfect. At home I have a marine reef tank, which I just love and on top of that I've an awesome dog, called Ziggy.

Shorter copy is powerful. 200-300 words or less is a good rule of thumb if you aren’t using a full blog post, especially if you are sending more than one email a week. We have used this idea of using only part of a blog post in our own emails, making sure that the introductory copy was sufficient to let the reader know exactly what the post was about. Entice without tricking, in other words.
People like more choices, so consider creating subscription levels that let people sign up to receive content that’s relevant to them. For example, if you sell widgets and tax advice, provide three options on your opt-in form that allow users to sign up to receive info about widgets, info about tax advice or both. Further customize by allowing them to designate how frequently they’d like to hear from you — weekly, monthly or only when something really special is going on. People may be more likely to sign up for your email list if they have some control over the content they’ll receive.
Your current customer base is a great place to start building your email list. If you have a CRM system, you probably have already have clients’ email addresses. The more information you have, the better. Start with an overarching list that includes all customers and then keep segmenting and branching out based on who your customers are, where they are located, what they purchased, or any other number of relevant variables that you have collected. If you don’t have a CRM and have not been collecting emails of past clients, then you’ll have little tougher time. Try calling your past and current customers, look on their website for contact information or reach out on social media to acquire their emails. Starting with your current and past customers will give you a solid foundation to build on.  
When creating an offer, a landing page, subscription/sign up form, ask only for necessary information. People really don’t want to be bothered to fill in infinite spaces; in most cases, an email address and a name are more than enough. Ask for more info, and people won’t take time to fill it out, let alone leave their email. To successfully collect email addresses,  keep it short and straightforward.
"Before I came across Rapid List Building I was shooting blindly in the dark just hoping and praying that what I was doing would work. Now I have a roadmap to grow my list. No more hoping, guessing, and wasting time. I finally feel confident and in control. And the best part...I'm now adding 100+ new subscribers to my email list every day. I'm on track to double my revenue this year."
Your tip about CTA’s really hit the spot. I’ve been noticing that some of our competitors are using wordy yet highly specific buttons like ‘Get My Free Consultation Now!’ or ‘See Other Works From ____’. I was skeptic at first, but reading your logic behind it, it makes sense. I’m looking forward to implementing this on my own sites. Thank you, Brian.
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