Conversations. You’ve had conversations with people on social media. What are they talking about? What are they repeatedly asking you about? Wouldn’t you love to have an email autoresponder handy so the next time you’re asked, you can mention that it is available? Places like Inbound or Quora are a great place to find out what people want to know about. Just read the conversations they have with each other. Answer their questions, and tell them about your email autoresponder. Social media isn’t as mathematical as pure analytics, but it is a good measurement of what people say they are interested in.

Great article! I have been struggling with an email list. I have it set up and my thank you email then just simply a once a week email with my latest posts that I don’t even have to do it does it for me. I really need to buckle down and focus on my subscribers. I also should do a test to see what is working and what is not. Switch it up a but. Thanks for the info!
“Hand-curated prospect list and email outreach every month. We explore and build sold once-only prospect lists, focused on your customer profiles. Best for the motivated business, startup, consultant, or freelancer. Each month we provide you with a fresh hand-curated list. We also mail you the winning email copy and design tailor-made for each of your customer profile. We are here to make you succeed and offer continuous support and sales review.”
Brian , your every post is like a book, I always read your post and try to find a few questions to ask .. but to be honest your posts are that comprehensive that, I don’t find a question to ask because you left nothing unexplained ! I wonder how long you take to prepare a post like this, I probably would take a whole year ! 🙂 Good luck Brian. you are a magician of IM strategies.
And talking about Social Media, why not use its incredible power to gain more subscribers? Like, come up with specific Social Media challenge, something that aligns with your brand and has value for your followers. Invite them to participate with the clear CTA and follow through the idea. That can be anything from a smart eating challenge, or how to become a better storyteller or a fitness challenge. The idea is to get people involved, offer a value that is worth giving an email address for.
Offline events like trade shows are highly anticipated growth opportunities for professionals in your industry. Demo your latest product at an appropriate conference and collect signups in-person. Once you're back at the office, import these signups into your contact database. Be sure to send these contacts a welcome email that confirms their opt-in to your list. (See #8 in this blog post for tips on sending welcome emails.)

While consumers have steadily become desensitized to giving out personal emails, they will be more apt to provide an email if there is a value exchange. As we mentioned above, simply asking someone to join your newsletter isn’t going to convince them that they are receiving value in return for their contact information.  It’s important to be transparent, convincing and urgent with your opt-in call-to-action. Some easy ways to offer value for opt-ins is to:

Shorter copy is powerful. 200-300 words or less is a good rule of thumb if you aren’t using a full blog post, especially if you are sending more than one email a week. We have used this idea of using only part of a blog post in our own emails, making sure that the introductory copy was sufficient to let the reader know exactly what the post was about. Entice without tricking, in other words.
The strategies recommended by Jennifer are easy to put into practice and effective. What I loved most about this course was the support that Jennifer has provided to all her students. She is a wonderful teacher and I appreciated the way she was committed to helping us implement the course and getting great results. I would recommend this course to any blogger who wants to focus on building a great mailing list.  
So many people talk about quick growth and numbers that it can be really discouraging AND have you chasing crazy numbers. Because email subscribers tend to be more high quality, that also means the list building tends to be slower over time. So first of all–ignore all the big talk about quick growth and high numbers. If you are trying to grow true, raving fans in your list, then your growth may have spikes, but should continue over time. Don’t ever stop thinking about email! Continue to consider what you can offer, where on your blog you can optimize for signups, and change things every few months.
Search terms: You can find out the specific terms people are using to find your site, which will help you decide what the most popular topics for your readers are. However, Google searches are increasingly not providing the specific search terms that they used to, going with “not provided” instead, so this ability may decrease in the future (at least with the Google search engine).

If at any point in the course you feel overwhelmed or lost, you have three mechanisms to get you back on track:1) Me! Take full advantage of the unlimited coaching 2) The community. There are hundreds of other people on this journey with you. We have an active and vibrant community full of folks that have been exactly where you are. 3) Strategy calls. Take advantage of the one-on-one strategy call you get with me. We can workshop through any questions or hold-ups you are facing.

A useful footer. Below your main content is the footer of your email. It should contain a clear and simple way for your reader to unsubscribe, as required by the CAN-SPAM Act. Mention why they are getting the email (they signed up), and how to contact you. Email apps often take care of this for you, but just be sure it is included. The footer area is where you could do “self-advertising” if you wanted to. Keep it simple, if you choose to do it, preferably just one or two “ads” or links.
When creating an offer, a landing page, subscription/sign up form, ask only for necessary information. People really don’t want to be bothered to fill in infinite spaces; in most cases, an email address and a name are more than enough. Ask for more info, and people won’t take time to fill it out, let alone leave their email. To successfully collect email addresses,  keep it short and straightforward.
Your tip about CTA’s really hit the spot. I’ve been noticing that some of our competitors are using wordy yet highly specific buttons like ‘Get My Free Consultation Now!’ or ‘See Other Works From ____’. I was skeptic at first, but reading your logic behind it, it makes sense. I’m looking forward to implementing this on my own sites. Thank you, Brian.
×